Due to some inclement weather being experienced near our offices, our phone lines are experiencing temporary connectivity issue. Please feel free to contact us via chat or email. We apologize for the inconvenience.
Testimonials
[woo_multi_currency_plain_horizontal]
Hard Hat Training, Compliant OSHA Safety Training Services, Earn National Certificate of Compliance
Top 20 Safety and Wellness training
Contact (English & Spanish): 208-252-5331
Monday-Friday 8am-4pm MST

Hot Work Safety Training & Certification

What do we offer? Whether you want Hot Work safety training and certification in as little as two hours with our online training or a more robust, customizable option like you get with our DIY training kits or on-site training, we can help you get the Hot Work certification you want, in the way you want it, and at a price, you can afford.

What are my options for Hot Work safety training?

Training Kits

The kit is for those who want to do the training themselves. It's a reusable hot work safety training PPT used to train groups of people all at one time in one location. If you need to train a trainer to use the kit we offer a train the trainer online course.

Online Training

Online is for those who prefer self-paced training from any location or for employers who need to assign and monitor employee training progress and exam scores. Online training is also eligible for bulk pricing discounts for groups of 16+ trainees.

Train the Trainer

Train the trainer courses are online and meant to certify a single individual to use the training kit to train others. The kit is included with the train the trainer online course for no additional cost and is reusable. Results in a lifetime certification.

Onsite Training

Onsite training is for companies looking for hands-on training on your own equipment at your location. We come to you (from Rexburg, Idaho) so travel expenses are included, because of this onsite training is best for groups of at least 5-10+ trainees.

What's in the Hot Work Training Course?

Our Hot Work training course is regulation-compliant, and our online version fulfills classroom training requirements. Each class contains sections on Pre-Shift Inspections and Safe Operations and more.

During this training, we will be taking a look at the specific procedures and tasks that are required of someone who is performing hot work. As part of this training, you will learn the importance of performing pre-shift inspections and conducting safe operations during the shift. We will emphasize the necessity to thoroughly inspect the work site before beginning hot work and to obtain a hot work permit. Finally, we will use case studies to demonstrate the negative results that may occur from ignoring or not complying with your hot work duties.

This hot work program template includes intermittent practice quiz questions to prepare for the final written exam included with the course. In addition to the written exam, this course also includes a checklist for employers to use when administering a practical exam as required by OSHA. Though you will still need to familiarize yourself with all other applicable federal, state, and local standards, this training encompasses the following laws and regulations:

  • Encompasses these U.S. Standards
  • General Industry

    • 1910.252 – General Requirements

    • 1910 Subpart Q – Welding, Cutting, and Brazing

    • 1910.352 Subpart J – Welding and Cutting

  • Maritime
    • 1915 – Regulations for Shipyard Employment

      • 1915.14 – Hot Work
      • 1915.503 – Precautions for Hot Work
    • 1917 – Regulations for Marine Terminals

      • 1917.152 – Welding, Cutting, and Heating (Hot Work)
  • Encompasses these Canadian Standards
  • NFPA 51B – Fire Prevention in the Use of Cutting and Welding Processes

  • CSA Standard W117.2-12 – Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes

  • ANSI Z49.1:2012 – Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes

Why do I need Hot Work training?

In line with regulations, anyone who conducts hot work must receive training prior to carrying out any hot work duties. Requirements for refresher training related to forklifts or other processes are very specific. Most other equipment doesn’t have such specific requirements, but it’s wise to follow the same guidelines.

When it comes to refresher training, the standards in some instances (like forklifts) are very specific: operators must be re-evaluated every three years to see if they are still competent to operate the equipment. Best practices say to apply this same rule to all types of equipment. A so-called “free-pass” cannot be awarded based on experience, age, or time on the job. The extent of the evaluation is to be determined by the employer but should include a written and practical examination that prove continued competency.

  • Blog Posts


  • COMING SOON

Browse our other available trainings:

Hot Work Training Frequently Asked Questions 

What does hot work include?

Hot work is any work that involves burning, welding, cutting, brazing, soldering, grinding, using fire- or spark-producing tools, and any other work that produces any source of ignition. Hot work procedures may produce sparks, fire, molten slag, or hot material that has a potential to cause fires or explosions.

What does a hot work permit tell you?

Hot work permits identify several pieces of information such as the work that is to be done, who is to perform it, the length of time it will take, the hazards associated with the work, and the control measures used. As a whole, it confirms that the area has been cleared for hot work and, if control measures are implemented, that it is safe to begin work in that area.

Does OSHA require Hot Work training?

Yes, absolutely. OSHA has a few key standards that are a “catch-all” of sorts. 29 CFR 1926.20 and 21 lay the general groundwork for safety training requirements—no matter the equipment or situation. Simply put, these two standards state very clearly that it is the employer’s responsibility to train operators. More specifically, 1926.21(b)(2) states that “the employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury.”

Bottom line, if you don’t train and there is an accident, and OSHA comes in to investigate (and they will), you better believe they will ask for proof that workers have been trained (when and on what subjects). And if you can’t prove it, they will most likely refer to these standards and the OSH Act of 1970 as the basis for their citations.

"Stop training the hard way. Do it the Hard Hat Training way instead!"
Making training easy and affordable.