Pendant Warning Tags – Overhead Crane & Hoists

$5.00$375.00

Our overhead crane pendant warning tags are made from a thick flexible plastic that won’t break easily. For OSHA and ANSI compliance (ANSI B30.16 Safety Code for hoists, and hoist manufacturer’s instructions), each wire rope or electric chain hoist should have one installed on the pendant. The pendant warning tag comes in English on one side, Spanish on the other. 

Size: approximately 9″ x 2.75″ and the thickness of a penny.


Interested in unbranded pendant warning labels for resale? Contact us today or call (360) 930-9247.

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Description

Pendant warning tags for pendant controls on overhead cranes and hoists. This overhead crane tag comes in English on one side and Spanish on the other.

ANSI B30.16 Safety Code for hoists, and hoist manufacturers instructions.

Overhead cranes and chain hoists are a common site across virtually every industry–construction, maritime, manufacturing, automotive, grocery, aerospace and municipalities, and more. Whether you operate a traveling bridge crane, a monorail crane, a floor mounted jib, a wall mounted jib, a gantry crane, or a mobile gantry crane, like a Gorbel crane, there are standards you have to abide by.

Specific to this product, all overhead cranes have pendant controls and OSHA and ANSI regulations require that these overhead pendant controls have a warning tag attached to the pendant line. Even if you use a remote control to move the bridge crane, if you have pendant controls dangling there, you need to have this warning tag fixed to the line. In these cases, you should also have one affixed to the overhead crane remote control.

There are a lot of overhead hoist warning tags on the market and you, of course, are free to choose what works best for you and fits within your budget. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter what the warning tags are made of, if you have them on the pendant control, you are in compliance.

But there are a couple things to note about our pendant warning tags for overhead crane pendant controls that we think make a big difference:

  1. A lot of bridge crane warning tags on the market are paper thin and prone to tearing. Ours are made of a very strong but flexible vinyl/plastic. They are roughly about the thickness of a penny, so they will last a long time.
  2. The overhead crane warning verbiage required by ANSI and OSHA is in English on one side and Spanish on the other. This way, if you have anyone overhead crane operators who speak Spanish, there is no chance of them not understanding these important warnings.
  3. We try to keep the price as competitive as possible. But we realize everyone has different budgets. So if you need and want the tags we offer, but you have a budget to stick to, let us know. Whether it’s these warning tags or our overhead crane training kits, our overhead crane training online courses, or our other training tools, we want you to get what you need at a price you can afford.

Why do you need pendant warning tags?

Recently, employee #1 was training employee #2 on how to use an overhead crane to move materials and objects around the foundry they both worked at. Employee #1 stepped away to assist another co-worker, told employee #2 to rig up the load, but do not move it until he returned. The chain being used did not have a warning tag on it for employee #2 to read. The tag would have let employee #2 know that the way he wrapped the chain around the material was not safe and the object needed to be rigged a different way. Wanting to impress employee #1 on his first day, employee #2 decided to not wait to move the load. Once the load was suspended in the air, employee #1 ran over to stop employee #2, as he knew the load was not rigged properly. Before he could get there, the load fell free and crashed to the ground, crushing employee #2’s foot. He ended up losing his foot but was able to work again.

Had the warning tag been in place, employee #2 would have been able to read “Do not operate hoist, install, or repair hoist unless trained and authorized”, “Do not operate hoist unless you have first read the operator’s manual” and “Do not wrap hoisting rope/chain around load”. Just one of those three warnings should have been enough to keep employee #2, who was just trying to be a good worker, patient until his trainer could come back and show him his mistake, how to correct it and kept his foot from getting crushed.