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What To Do If CAL OSHA Shows Up For An Inspection

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When OSHA Shows Up

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It's a normal day at work in California. You are performing your everyday tasks within your workplace like you always do. Suddenly, however, a CAL OSHA inspector arrives. There was no warning or notice that they would arrive, and your employer never let you know either.

In situations like these, there is no need for you to panic. Inspections performed either by federal OSHA or state plans like CAL OSHA are intended to be spontaneous. As long as the standards OSHA has established are being upheld, there is no need to worry.

What To Do If CAL OSHA Shows Up

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If an OSHA inspector arrives at your workplace, you should not let them in unless there is an employer on-site with you. It is important that the employer is present to speak with and accompany the inspector. It is not necessary, but you can also ask the inspector for the reason they have come. Inspections happen for a few different reasons and it's important to know why they are brought on. They can be:

  • Complaint-based
  • Facility-based
  • Targeted
  • Random

Obtain a copy of the complaint if it is complaint-based and make sure the information is passed on to your employer when they arrive to escort the inspector.

Safety Inspections

When an OSHA inspector arrives at your workplace, they are looking for hazards and potential violations of OSHA standards and regulations. Your employer is responsible for your safety, and as an employee, you will not be held accountable for violations of your safety.

Feel Free to Join

As an employee, it is your right to join in on OSHA inspections and ask the inspector questions. You do not need to, but doing so can help you learn more about safety standards and your workplace.

Topics to Prepare For Inspections

As an employee, you can benefit by knowing your rights and the standards associated with your workplace. Your employer is responsible for your safety and should:

  • Create a workplace culture based on safety.
  • Hold safety meetings and training to prepare you each day.
  • Familiarize you with hazards in the workplace and controls in place for them.
  • Familiarize you with the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) and Safety Management Systems (SMSs) in your workplace.
View CAL OSHA  Training Courses
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